Sudan4Jesus run: Chaos on Khartoum airport tarmac as Sudanese …

Link to web article here.

January 17, 2013 (KHARTOUM) – Sudanese authorities briefly suspended landing and takeoff at Khartoum International Airport on Thursday following a breach of the tarmac by mourners of singer Mahmoud Abdel-Aziz who passed away at a hospital in Jordan yesterday.
Mahmoud Abdel-Aziz
The situation got so chaotic as confusion prevailed over the arrival time of the private chartered plane carrying his body. Some of the crowd hovered around several planes thinking it contained his coffin.

Police eventually managed to disperse the gathering inside the runway after using tear gas. There were also limited clashes between the police and mourners at the nearby airport street.

The director of Sudan’s National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) had ordered a plane dispatched to Amman to bring home the late singer’s body who died from complications of stomach ulcers. He was a declared clinically dead a day before.

Thousands of hysterical fans flocked to Abdel-Aziz’s home in Khartoum to express their sadness amid scenes of loud weeping while some passed out.

Government and opposition leaders alike mourned the 44-years old singer calling him an iconic figure in the history of Sudanese music.

Abdel-Aziz appealed immensely not only to the younger generations but also to older ones who enjoyed his voice which was labeled as unique by music critics.

Singer Abdel Gadir Salem described Abdel-Aziz as an exceptional artist “who will not be repeated” in the history of music in Sudan adding that the events today were a testimony to his popularity and love he enjoyed among ordinary Sudanese.

Abdel-Aziz was born in 1967 Khartoum to a middle class family and began to demonstrate artistic capabilities at a young age.

He initially started as an actor but in the late 80’s he launched his music career with the help of established singers including Salah Iban al-Badiya. His first album was released in 1994 and his subsequent ones were record selling.

(ST)

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Sudan4Jesus run: Chaos on Khartoum airport tarmac as Sudanese …

Politics: The New Language of Sudanese Music? « Ola Diab's Blog

Al Jazeera English’s Poster of Sudan’s Protests

They sing to the president. They sing to stop his prolonged dictatorship. They sing for unity, change and freedom of their people and land.

“Mr. President, won’t you tell me why do I have to put up with all the lies? Promises you made for a better life,” says Nile, a Sudanese hip hop and R&B singer, song writer and music producer, in his latest song, “Mr. President”. Nile is not alone; NasJota, who are a group of Arab and Sudanese Hip Hop artists, released their newest song, “LA Dictatorship”, in June 2012, calling for change in Sudan. “LA Dictatorship” is in both Arabic and English, written in a form of code-switching. “Yes for love and equality. Say NO to cruelty…Until when we be living like a جبنة
جوة حلته لايك سجنه
we never speak the truth cause لسانه
لسانه هو مربوط مافي امانه
امانه هي مدسوسه في كورنه
والكورنه موجودة في قلبنا
قلبنا من القرف قال كفايه
كفايه من الظلم دي الحكايه,” says the lyrics of “LA Dictatorship” (You can find the full lyrics under LA Dictatorship’s music video on YouTube).

This is the first time Sudanese hip hop and R&B artists use music as an expression of their political views in the English language. Mohamed Wardi, a Nubian Sudanese singer who died recently in February 2012, is probably one of the very few Arabic-singing artists who addressed his political views and called for revolution in his music. Consequently, he was jailed. After his release, he went to Egypt in 1989 for voluntary exile but returned to Sudan in 2003.

Southern Sudanese musicians, however, are not new in this business. Musicians of  South Sudan have always used music to portray their political views whether in Arabic, English or in any of their tribal languages. Emmanuel Jal, a Southern Sudanese Hip Hop artist and peace activist, is one example who uses his music to promote peace in Sudan.

This new trend Nile and NasJota introduced is very timely with the current protests in Sudan, which university students triggered on June 16 due to the planned government cuts to fuel subsidies and other spending. Sudan’s economy weakened since South Sudan seceded last July, taking with it three-quarters of Sudan’s oil production. Demonstrations broke out in several places in Khartoum and elsewhere as hundreds of Sudanese set fire to tires and trees, threw stones, and blocked roads especially as police tried to end the demonstrations. Al Jazeera, BBC News and other news agencies have referred to the protests as part of of the Arab Spring, a new concept in the region. However, regardless of the current protests, it is important to state that the people of Sudan have succeeded in overthrowing the governments twice in the last 50 years.

Although Nile and NasJota do not reside in Sudan, they still play a role in the protests by producing revolutionary music. Nile is a Sudanese Soul, Hip Hop and R&B singer, song writer and music producer based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Born Moawia Ahmed Khalid, he wrote and produced over 40 songs most of which are romantic. “Mr. President” is his first politically-motivated song. NasJota, however, have long produced and collaborated in making protest-like songs. The label’s music is inclusive of other African and Middle Eastern people, including non-Sudanese artists and music. Located in the United States, NasJota claims to be the first Arabic and Sudanese record label, TV and radio station.

The songs “Mr. President” and “LA Dictatorship” have gained thousands of views on YouTube. With Sudan’s current political and economical climate and increasing protests, more people might will listen to these songs and those similar to them. More Sudanese R&B and hip hop artists might follow this new trend especially if the demonstrations in Sudan intensify. “Mr. President” and “LA Dictatorship” may not physically contribute to the demonstrations, but at least the songs give the Sudanese people, especially those living abroad, a sense of motivation and reconstruction.

Listen to Nile’s latest song, “Mr. President”:

Listen to Nas Jota’s latest song, “La Dictatorship”: 

You may also visit Nas Jota’s website at http://www.nasjota.com/

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Politics: The New Language of Sudanese Music? « Ola Diab's Blog

Alsarah & Nubatones Bring Hip Sudanese Music to Mass MoCA Nov …

Alsarah comes to the Berkshires and Mass MoCA, together with her band the Nubatones, to create music that reflects a journey through diaspora; this is musical migration filtered through an urban lens.

In an unusual evening that blends 1970s Nubian songs, Western soul, and vintage Sudanese pop, Alsarah and the Nubatones rock Club B-10 at MASS MoCA on Saturday, November 10, 2012.

Heavily influenced by music from both her native homeland and her adopted ones Alsarah, a Sudanese-American firecracker, is the leading lady of this extraordinary band bound together by a collective love for Nubian music and the belief that soul transcends all cultural barriers. Much of the music performed up in the club at MASS MoCA is sponsored by the Hans & Kate Morris Fund for New Music.

Born in Sudan’s capital city, Khartoum, Alsarah grew up in Sudan, Yemen, and the Berkshires. After attending the Pioneer Valley Performing Arts Charter High School in Hadley, Massachusetts, she attended Wesleyan University, and now resides in Brooklyn, New York. Alsarah performs music from different parts of the Middle East and East Africa.

Afropop Worldwide calls the band’s sound “a blend of original compositions and traditional pieces, grounded in the Sudanese and Nubian musical traditions but sails in the pocket of funk and soul music.” Inspired by the pentatonic scale – the musical mode with five notes per octave as opposed to a heptatonic seven-note scale that much of Western music utilizes – the band brings a fresh perspective to music.

Alsarah and the Nubatones take the stage in MASS MoCA’s Club B-10 on Saturday, November 10, at 8 PM. Club B-10 is an intimate, casual venue on the third floor of MASS MoCA. Tickets are $12 in advance or $16 on the day of the show. Student tickets are $10. Members receive a 10% discount on tickets. Tickets are available through the MASS MoCA Box Office, located off Marshall Street in North Adams, from 11 AM until 5 PM (closed Tuesdays). Tickets can also be charged by phone by calling 413.662.2111 during Box Office hours or purchased online at www.massmoca.org.

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Alsarah & Nubatones Bring Hip Sudanese Music to Mass MoCA Nov …

Soomaaliya oo si weyn uga dhex muuqatay Shirka Haweenka …

Posted on January 23, 2013 by SomaliSwiss

Magaalada Khartoum ee Caasimada Dalka Sudan  waxaa ka Socda  shir ay ku leeyihiin Baarlamaanada Wadamada Islaamka ah, iyadoo sidoo kale ay ka garab socdo Shir ay ku leeyihiin Xildhibaanada Haweenka ah ee Wadamada Islaamka ah. HOOS KA FIIRI SAWIRADA.

Shirkan ay khartoum ku yeesheen Haweenka Baarlamaaniyaadka ah in ka badan 29 Dowladood oo ay Soomaaliya ka mid tahay ayaa waxa ay kaga hadleen sidii loo xoojin laha xariirka Haweenka Baarlamaaniyaadka ee wadamada islaamka.

Shirkan oo ay  Soomaaliya u matalayeen  laba  Xildhibaan oo ka tirsan haweenka Xildhibaanada ah ee Dowladda Federalka ah ee Soomaaliya ayaa waxa ay kala yihiin Sacdiyo Carees Ciise kaarshe iyo Aamino Maxamed Cabdi.

Aamino Maxamed Cabdi oo u hadlaysay warbaahinta qaranka Soomaaliyeed ayaa sheegtay in shirkaas ay Haweenkii baarlamaaniyaadka ahaa ay u sheegtay waxa Soomaaliya ka socda gaar ahaan Xaalada Haweenka Soomaaliyeed oo ay tilmaantay in Dowladan hada jirta ay tahay Dowladii ugu horaysay ee xilal waa wayn oo heer sare ah u dhiibtay Dumarka Soomaaliyeed.

Xildhibaanad Aamina ayaa intaas ku dartay in ay haweenka Soomaaliyeed ay haystaan Xilalka ugu sareeya Dowladda sida Raysul wasaare ku xigeenka ahna wasiirada arimaha Dibadda iyo Wasiirada Wasaaradda Adeega Bulshad iyo Xildhibaano  Baarlamaanka ku jira.

Waxayna ugu Dambentii ugu Baaqday Gabdhihii ka socday Baarlamaanada Wadamada islaamka ah in ay wafdi indha indhayn ah ay usoo diraan wadanka Soomaaliya.

Waa  markii ugu horaysan inta la ogyahay ilaa intii ay bur burtay Dowladii dhexe ee Soomaaliya ay Haween Baarlamaanka  Soomaaliya ka socda ay ka qayb galaan shir Noocan oo kale ah.

SomaliSwiss Khartuum

SomaliSwiss@hotmail.com

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Soomaaliya oo si weyn uga dhex muuqatay Shirka Haweenka …

The “Whale” of Sudanese Music Passes | Al Akhbar English

News of Sudanese singer Mahmoud Abdel-Aziz's death came as a shock to his fans. The singer, born in 1967, was hospitalized in Jordan after suffering from a brain hemorrhage that caused extensive damage. Though a

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The “Whale” of Sudanese Music Passes | Al Akhbar English

Sudan: Musical traditions old and new

Gareth Bonello from Welsh band Pen Pastwn, blogs about the band’s visit to Sudan, the musical traditions they discovered and about being on of the few western bands to perform in Sudan in the last 32 years.

I have to admit that when the British Council contacted Pen Pastwn at short notice and asked if we’d like to do some gigs in Sudan it took me a little by surprise. My knowledge of Sudan was based solely on what I had seen on the news or read in the papers. It had never crossed my mind that it might be a place I would visit. The trip would involve two concerts, the first in Port Sudan and the other in the capital Khartoum.

Two weeks later I was in Port Sudan with folk-psych-rock collective Pen Pastwn. Over the past two years we have been the in-house band for an evening of music and literature at Chapter Arts Centre in Cardiff, as well as performing our own material. As a result, collaborating with musicians and writers has become a bit of a specialty, and we were all extremely keen to get jamming with the local musicians.

On our first full day we met Beja singer Siddi Doshka and his band. It wasn’t long before the music was flowing and we were jamming on each other’s songs. Siddi’s music was based around the pentatonic scale and to my ears it had a much stronger African influence than the Middle-Eastern one that I had been expecting. His voice, though unamplified, carried and reverberated around the room like a bell. The jam went so well that the next day we joined Siddi and his band on stage and performed several tracks together.

Pen Pastwn in the desert in Sudan

Sudan has had a tricky relationship with music and dance in recent times. Many musicians had to stop performing following the imposition of strict Sharia law in 1989. The feeling I got whilst out there was that there are elements within the establishment that are still deeply distrustful of musical events and concerts are sometimes cancelled at the last minute. We were told that the event we were playing was one of only a few of its kind to take place in Port Sudan during the last 32 years.

That is why the work that the Creative Coalitions Project is doing in Sudan is so good, because through the project, concerts have been going ahead and musical talent is being developed. We all felt that we were contributing in a very small way just by performing.

The highlight of the trip for me was jamming with Siddi Doshka live on stage in Port Sudan. The gig was in the open with no fences or barriers, so anyone could come and listen. It was a great feeling to look out and see a crowd of hundreds enjoying free music in the open air.

Afterwards it was clear that the audience had enjoyed the night as much as we had and we were swamped by people who wanted to greet us. We ended up spending a good hour and a half meeting everyone, taking photos and discussing music. We were all overwhelmed by the response and developed a real affinity for the people of Port Sudan.

Hopefully, more events will be staged there in the near future, and who knows? Perhaps we will be there again too. I think I speak for everyone in the band when I say that I hope so.

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Sudan: Musical traditions old and new

Chaos on Khartoum airport tarmac as Sudanese singer's body …

January 18, 2013 (KHARTOUM) – Sudanese authorities briefly suspended landing and takeoff at Khartoum International Airport on Thursday following a breach of the tarmac by mourners of singer Mahmoud Abdel-Aziz who passed away at a hospital in Jordan yesterday.

The situation got so chaotic as confusion prevailed over the arrival time of the private chartered plane carrying his body. Some of the crowd hovered around several planes thinking it contained his coffin.

Police eventually managed to disperse the gathering inside the runway after using tear gas. There were also limited clashes between the police and mourners at the nearby airport street.

The director of Sudan’s National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) had ordered a plane dispatched to Amman to bring home the late singer’s body who died from complications of stomach ulcers. He was a declared clinically dead a day before.

Thousands of hysterical fans flocked to Abdel-Aziz’s home in Khartoum to express their sadness amid scenes of loud weeping while some passed out.

Government and opposition leaders alike mourned the 44-years old singer calling him an iconic figure in the history of Sudanese music.

Abdel-Aziz appealed immensely not only to the younger generations but also to older ones who enjoyed his voice which was labeled as unique by music critics.

Singer Abdel Gadir Salem described Abdel-Aziz as an exceptional artist "who will not be repeated" in the history of music in Sudan adding that the events today were a testimony to his popularity and love he enjoyed among ordinary Sudanese.

Abdel-Aziz was born in 1967 Khartoum to a middle class family and began to demonstrate artistic capabilities at a young age.

He initially started as an actor but in the late 80’s he launched his music career with the help of established singers including Salah Iban al-Badiya. His first album was released in 1994 and his subsequent ones were record selling.

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Chaos on Khartoum airport tarmac as Sudanese singer's body …

New South Sudan Music 2013 Saava Karim Ugrecords1 | 2to

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I DID NOT MAKE THE EXPLOIT IT WAS A ACCIDENT TO TYPE THAT. Hello, and this is a special Exploit I made and I wasent going to let the video out until the following day, 2013. This video helps…

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New South Sudan Music 2013 Saava Karim Ugrecords1 | 2to

South Sudan Music 2013 – YABA ANGELOSI – DJ Erycom Uganda …

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Sudanese Women Singers Assert Themselves With “Girls' Music”

In Sudan, resistance to patriarchy, tradition and narrowly defined gender roles was expressed through a genre of urban fusion music called aghani al-banat, translated to mean “girls' music.” This musical tradition created a

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Sudanese Women Singers Assert Themselves With “Girls' Music”